Tag Archives: What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature

Charlie Chan Is Dead: An Anthology of Contemporary Asian American Fiction edited by Jessica Hagedorn

Charlie Chan Is DeadThis anthology, which includes both short stories and excerpts from larger works, celebrates the diversity of Asian American literature, from the many literary styles to the various ethnic backgrounds, ages and beliefs of the 48 writers included in this collection.

Created by a white man named Earl Derr Biggers in 1925, Charlie Chan was one of the ultimate Asian stereotypes, known for his obsequious manner and broken English versions of fortune-cookie pop psychology. The diverse, individual, invincible Asian American voices in this collection prove that such cartoonish Asian Americans never existed in reality.

A contemporary collection picking up where Aiiieeeee! left off. And then continues on with Charlie Chan Is Dead 2, too!

Reviews: Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

“Necessary Titles for the APA Heritage Bookshelf,” aMagazine: Inside Asian America, April/May 2001

Readers: Young Adult, Adult

Published: 1993

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Filed under ..Adult Readers, ..Young Adult Readers, .Fiction, .Short Stories, Pan-Asian Pacific American

Grandfather’s Journey by Allen Say

Grandfather's JourneyA Japanese American man recounts his grandfather’s journey from Japan to America, and back to Japan. He comes to understand his grandfather’s feelings of being torn by a sense of being home in two very different countries, and longing for one while in the other.

Grandfather justly won the 1994 Caldecott Medal, the highest honor in the U.S. for illustrators. It’s a stupendous combination of poignant storytelling about universal journeys illuminated by spectacular images that live far beyond the page.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1993

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Filed under ...Absolute Favorites, ..Children/Picture Books, .Nonfiction, Japanese American

Stranger in the Mirror by Allen Say

Stranger in the MirroSam wakes up one day with the face of his elderly grandfather. He has a frustrating time trying to convince his family and friends that he really is still Sam inside. Only when he takes to the skateboard does he feel like his old self again.

While Stranger is just one of Say’s many memorable titles, Stranger remains one of his most extraordinary.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1995

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Fiction, Japanese American

Tree of Cranes by Allen Say

Tree of CranesA lovely story about a young Japanese boy who learns about Christmas for the first time from his California-born Japanese American mother as she prepares a special pine tree, decorated with paper cranes.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1991

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Fiction, Japanese, Japanese American

A River Dream by Allen Say

River DreamMark is in bed with a high fever. His Uncle Scott sends him a metal box for trout flies, which brings back memories of Mark’s first fishing trip. He’s transported to a sparkling river, meets up with Uncle Scott, and catches his biggest fish ever. But Mark learns that perhaps it’s better to “leave the river the way [he] found it.”

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1988

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Fiction, Japanese American, Nonethnic-specific

The Lost Lake by Allen Say

Lost LakeLuke and his father embark on a camping trip to “the Lost Lake,” where the father used to go with his own father. When they arrive they find that too many others have discovered it, as well. Father and son continue on their journey, sharing new experiences and discovering one another.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1989

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Fiction, Japanese American, Nonethnic-specific

The Boy of the Three-Year Nap by Dianne Snyder, illustrated by Allen Say

Boy of the Three-Year NapTaro is known throughout the village as its laziest citizen. When a rich merchant moves into town, he hatches a plan to ensure an easy life by convincing the merchant that his daughter must marry Taro. But Taro’s mother has plans of her own, and his napping days soon come to an end.

Prolific (and stupendous) illustrator Allen Say won a 1989 Caldecott Honor with this humorous title.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1988

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Fiction, Japanese, Japanese American

Aekyung’s Dream by Min Paek

Aekyung's DreamAekyung, a young Korean girl recently arrived in the U.S., is teased at school for her different features and has not yet made friends. Inspired by a dream about King Sejong who created Hangul, the Korean alphabet, Aekyung learns English and begins to adjust to her new life.

A bilingual book, written in both English and Korean.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1988

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Bilingual, .Fiction, Korean American

Magic Spring: A Korean Folktale by Nami Rhee

Magic SpringA hardworking, childless elderly couple are led to the fountain of youth by a mysterious bluebird and warned to take just a sip. Their greedy neighbor hears about their discovery, rushes to the magic spring and overindulges, leading to a surprise ending.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1993

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Fiction, Korean, Korean American

Baseball Saved Us by Ken Mochizuki, illustrated by Dom Lee

Baseball Saved Us“Shorty,” a young Japanese American boy, and his family are forcibly relocated to an American concentration camp during World War II. There, in order to help the children survive the barbed wire fences and armed guards, Shorty’s father organizes a baseball league. Although small, the determined “Shorty” proves to be a talented player.

During World War II, some 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry were imprisoned in concentration camps throughout the American West because they were unjustly perceived to be a national security threat. In 1988, the U.S. government formally apologized, including monetary reparations for loss of property and basic human dignity. This award winning story is based on actual experiences.

Review: “Asian American Titles,” What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature, Gale Research, 1997

Readers: Children

Published: 1993

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Filed under ..Children/Picture Books, .Nonfiction, Japanese American