Tag Archives: Anjali Banerjee

Author Interview: Anjali Banerjee

With her past seven published novels – written for audiences that range from middle-grade readers on up – Anjali Banerjee didn’t particularly mention male body parts in any great detail. Maybe a twinkling eye here, capable hands there, but she certainly didn’t dwell. But as the saying goes, there’s a first time for everything.

Indeed, welcome to Haunting Jasmine, Banerjee’s eighth novel, her third for adults: Page one opens with an avid discussion on the fidelity factor of male genitalia based on ethnicity, complete with images of… well, shall we say… gold-embroidered formalwear for the faithful Bengali member. Five pages later, our betrayed heroine is not above asking the elephant god Ganesh to put a curse – à la Lorena Bobbit – on her heartbreaking spouse’s non-Bengali, all-American private parts. Oh, ouch.

Painful initial details aside, Banerjee’s latest is actually another easy-breezy, deftly entertaining love story, this time with spine-tingling twists. Searching for respite from her cheating soon-to-be-ex, the eponymous Jasmine heads home to remote Shelter Island in the Pacific Northwest where she’s agreed to watch Auntie Ruma’s bookstore for a month. Auntie Ruma needs the time to have her “heart fixed in India,” and only Jasmine can be entrusted to take care of the historic Victorian and the treasures – literary and otherwise – that reside within.

Books and writing – and certainly some multi-culti magic – have always been a part of Banerjee’s life. Born in India, and raised in small-town Canada and later big-city California, Banerjee found special inspiration in her literary maternal grandmother, herself an English writer who called India home.

From the moment Banerjee “could pick up a crayon and scribble,” she started writing. She wrote her first story at age seven, and in spite of “preposterous premises and impossible plots,” she never stopped. While she’s “not sure of a specific moment when I decided to become a writer” – she did have a few career detours as a veterinary assistant, an office manager, a law student, to name a few – Banerjee readily acknowledges that “writing has always been part of who I am.”

Since publishing her first title in 2005 – her lauded kiddie novel Maya Running, about an awkward young Indian American girl who goes through a 13 Going on 30-sort of transformation (sans the timely fast-forward) and becomes an assertive, multilingual beauty overnight – Banerjee has managed to publish more than a book a year. Even with five books for middle grade readers and three more for us oldsters, all out in just six years, Banerjee insists, “I’m not that prolific!”

In case you’re about to set off for the library or local bookstore, you’ll need the rest of Banerjee’s titles: In addition to Maya, her other younger-reader novels are Rani and the Fashion Divas, The Silver Spell, Looking for Bapu, and most recently Seaglass Summer; her adult titles before Haunting Jasmine are Imaginary Men and Invisible Lives (with nary a mention in either about certain appendages. Ahem).

So Haunting Jasmine starts with quite a saucy departure from your previous novels. What prompted the impulse?
The departure seemed right for my character, a jilted divorcée whose husband cheated on her. He dashed her dreams for a perfect life and a happy marriage – her thoughts seemed appropriate for the situation! [... click here for more]

Author interview: Feature: “An Interview with Anjali Banerjee,” Bookslut.com, February 2011

Readers: Adult

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Filed under ...Author Interview/Profile, ..Adult Readers, ..Middle Grade Readers, .Fiction, Indian American, South Asian American

Haunting Jasmine by Anjali Banerjee

What better way to get over a broken heart than moving into a unique, welcoming bookstore, filled not only with fabulous books but a few wise (less than living) writers, too? As long as they can spin a convincing yarn, why quibble with such minor details like life and death? Sign me up and throw away the key!

In Anjali Banerjee‘s third novel for adults (her eighth overall), about-to-be-divorced Jasmine heads home to remote Shelter Island in the Pacific Northwest where she’s agreed to watch Auntie Ruma’s bookstore for a month. The respite is just what Jasmine needs to extricate herself from her painful LA life, filled with constant separation battles with her cheating soon-to-be-ex. Auntie Ruma needs the time to have her “heart fixed in India,” and only Jasmine can be entrusted to take care of the historic Victorian and the treasures that lie within …

Without Crackberry and internet access, Jasmine is forced to unplug. Instead of planning complicated investment strategies, she’s soon drawing on literary reserves she didn’t realize she had to lead the local book club, then donning magic rabbit ears for a much younger audience. The local townies seem to know a bit too much about her, her bookstore’s single employee Tom is less than patient with her, and that mysterious stranger is a bit too bold!

Meanwhile, books are either glowing or tumbling off the shelf, she’s seeing and hearing things that are just not rationally possible, not to mention the dust and disorder wreaking havoc on her good senses. How will she survive a whole month …?

Banerjee has created another fast, light read, this time with a few spine-tingling twists. Jasmine seems to almost be an adult version of her last middle grade title, Seaglass Summer, with both protagonists finding respite and renewal on a Washington coastline island. Two books, two islands … might this be the early beginnings of a 21st-century, chick lit version of Yoknapatawpha County in the Northwest? It’s already starting to sound like an inviting literary destination …

To check out other entertaining titles by Anjali Banerjee on BookDragon, click here.

Readers: Adult

Published: 2011

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Filed under ..Adult Readers, .Fiction, Indian American, South Asian American

Seaglass Summer by Anjali Banerjee

When her parents take their annual summer trip to India, 11-year-old Poppy decides it’s the perfect chance to spend a month with her veterinarian Uncle Sanjay who runs an animal clinic on Nisqually Island off Washington’s coast. How else can she learn to be a vet, too, especially since her allergy-suffering mother has a no-pets policy at home.

Uncle Sanjay, who’s rather like a rock star on the idyllic island with his easy manner and his saving skills, is a patient teacher who teaches Poppy that being a vet means much more than holding puppies and cuddling felines. Her summer is not without challenges, from learning to deal with real blood and other yucky stuff, testing new friendships, and learning the sometimes high cost of following your dreams.

Anjali Banerjee‘s latest for middle-grade readers is another breezy fun read with just enough heartfelt moments that will make even us wizened adults shed a tear or two. Banerjee’s own devotion to her furry loved ones (the book is dedicated to her beloved late kitty Monet) is certainly evident, especially when she writes about Uncle Sanjay’s regular patient, Marmalade, an elderly cat whom Uncle Sanjay must soon help cross over to a peaceful afterlife. As the former guardian of four legendary kitties (our practice children before the human ones finally came along), I admit I sniffled and sobbed … who knew I was so schmaltzy in my old age?!

Tidbit: Anjali Banerjee was one of our many wonderful guests for SALTAF 2005 [South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival]. Mark your calendars for SALTAF 2010 which happens Saturday, November 13, 2010!

Readers: Middle Grade

Published: 2010

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Filed under ..Middle Grade Readers, .Fiction, Indian American, South Asian American

Invisible Lives by Anjali Banerjee

invisible-livesA fluffy, fast read to warm the heart: gorgeous Lakshmi hides behind glasses as she looks deep into others’ lives while helping women find the perfect sari. Always the dutiful daughter, she agrees to her matchmaking mother’s choice for husband, but the pink bubbles of true love will not be ignored.

Review: “TBR‘s Contributing Editors’ Favorite Reads of 2006: These Are a Few of My Favorite Things … in Print, That Is …,” The Bloomsbury Review, November/December 2006

Tidbit: Anjali Banerjee was one of our many wonderful guests for SALTAF 2005 [South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival].

Readers: Adult

Published: 2006

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Filed under ..Adult Readers, .Fiction, Indian American, South Asian American

Imaginary Men by Anjali Banerjee

Imaginary MenWhen Lina is bombarded by relatives who want to marry her off at her sister’s Indian wedding, she unthinkingly wards off the well-wishers by making up the perfect fiancé supposedly waiting for her back in San Francisco. One lie begets another until Lina – a professional matchmaker by trade! – is mired in self-created complications … and then the real-life Mr. Perfect just walks through her door. We should all believe in a little magic!

Review: “New and Notable Books,” AsianWeek, November 3, 2005

TidbitAnjali Banerjee was one of our many wonderful guests for SALTAF 2005 [South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival].

Readers: Adult

Published: 2005

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The Silver Spell by Anjali Banerjee

Silver SpellWhen Kellach and Driskoll’s beloved mother reappears after mysteriously disappearing five years ago, the family’s initially joyful reunion is overshadowed by the presence of evil. It’s up to Kellach and his girl-power buddy Moyra to save their entire town.

Review: “New and Notable Books,” AsianWeek, September 8, 2005

TidbitAnjali Banerjee was one of our many wonderful guests for SALTAF 2005 [South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival].

Readers: Middle Grade

Published: 2005

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Filed under ..Middle Grade Readers, .Fiction, Indian American, Nonethnic-specific

Maya Running by Anjali Banerjee

Maya RunningAs the only South Asian in her middle school, Maya knows all about being different in her tiny Canadian town. She doesn’t speak Bengali, she’s at that awkward stage of pimples and endless limbs, she doesn’t want to move to California, and she’s madly in love with the coolest boy in her school who just might like her back. When her perfectly gorgeous cousin, Pinky, arrives from India to exacerbate Maya’s insecuritiesl, Maya prays to Pinky’s round-bellied Hindu elephant god, Ganesh, for help. She goes through a 13 Going on 30 sort of transformation, without the fast-forward, literally becoming an assertive, multilingual, overnight beauty. But then, getting her wishes granted is just the beginning to realizing what she really wants in life.

Review: “New and Notable Books,” AsianWeek, February 25, 2005

TidbitAnjali Banerjee was one of our many wonderful guests for SALTAF 2005 [South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival].

Readers: Middle Grade

Published: 2005

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Filed under ..Middle Grade Readers, .Fiction, Canadian Asian Pacific American, Indian American, South Asian American